is one antenna enough for the BladeRf x40

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ChrisColeman
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Jan 23, 2019 7:18 am

is one antenna enough for the BladeRf x40

Post by ChrisColeman » Wed Jan 23, 2019 7:28 am

Hello community,

I am a student and I am very new to the SDR world

as it is mentioned in the title, is one antenna enough for the BaldeRf x40? because I have seen pictures all over the internet that people are using more than just one antenna!

I have ordered a Bladerf x40 + Log Periodic Antenna 850 MHz to 6.5 GHz

Shall I order an ANT500 also or it's not necessary?

Thank you in advance!

bglod
Posts: 201
Joined: Thu Jun 18, 2015 6:10 pm

Re: is one antenna enough for the BladeRf x40

Post by bglod » Wed Jan 23, 2019 8:23 am

If you want to perform full duplex operations, you'll want a second antenna.
Electrical Engineer
Nuand, LLC.

ChrisColeman
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Jan 23, 2019 7:18 am

Re: is one antenna enough for the BladeRf x40

Post by ChrisColeman » Wed Jan 23, 2019 9:48 am

Thank you bgold for your valuable answer, is it recommended to use two different antennas for duplex operations for example an Log Periodic Antenna 850 MHz to 6.5 GHz and an ANT500?

bglod
Posts: 201
Joined: Thu Jun 18, 2015 6:10 pm

Re: is one antenna enough for the BladeRf x40

Post by bglod » Wed Jan 23, 2019 10:18 am

If you want to transmit and receive simultaneously (full duplex), it is required to have two separate antennas. The transmit and receive antennas may be the same or different.

If you're just starting out, it's very common for folks to use a single generic antenna only on the receive side to "see what's out there". Then, at a later date -- when they feel comfortable transmitting, or have an application that requires full duplex -- they buy a second antenna. One reason is because antennas are very frequency specific, so for someone just starting out, they may not know what they want or need from the start. Also, transmitting is one of those things that you're "not really" supposed to do .. unless it's in an ISM band and below a certain power level, or you have a license.
Electrical Engineer
Nuand, LLC.

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